‘Only look back to see how far you’ve come’

I read this quote a while ago and I cannot find where I found it, so I’m doing the one thing academics should not do: write a quote without knowing the source.

At the moment this is what I am trying to focus on. I know that we use the past to make us better individuals, but that is not specifically what I am talking about. I am talking about those moments where we over analyse absolutely everything. It is something that people with anxiety do a lot. So, I am attempting to ‘let go’ of these moments and concentrate on what lies ahead.

My project ‘Looking for Thule’, is one where I can do just that. I can think about the wider world and the moments of serenity, silence and calm that we all crave in our everyday lives. That is why I am thinking that this will culminate in a book work. Something that you can take with you wherever you go. When things become difficult or stressful it is something that you can dip into to feel a sense of calm…finding your own Thule.

This is something that as I progress with this project I am finding more and more about. It is that sense of inner peace that we all crave. Mindfulness is becoming more and more apparent within this work, something that I didn’t contemplate at the start. We all lead busy, chaotic lives and we need to find that moment, not of ‘me time’ because that is selfish, but time to be inspired by the beauty that is around us. To me that is what Thule is becoming.

I am looking forward to the next stage of my journey as I navigate the paths of the South West Coast Path.

Advertisements

A walk on the landscape

So, by the featured image you can probably tell that I enjoy pushing the boundaries of photography and what a lot of people consider conventional photography. I do not believe that photography should be constraining and the boundaries should be pushing in whatever way your practice takes you.

My practice involves walking in the landscape and a couple of years ago when I was completing my final year of my undergraduate studies I took the decision to bury my film negatives. This lead to a series called Biosigna which gave the landscape an opportunity to have a voice through my photographs of that landscape.

I decided to take this a step further and to take the negatives of the landscapes that I had photographed and attached them to my boots. This allowed me to walk on the landscape to give a different dynamic to the work. It is about being in the land as well as the process of the land leaving an imprint in other ways on me. I am at the early stages of developing this work, but wanted to share my initial outcomes. This is a process of thinking out loud, which I am enjoying.